Many of you know that I’ve been an advocate for survivors of abuse for many years. As a person who in the past has been physically, verbally, psychologically, and financially abused it’s important to me that we reveal all of the tactics used by abusers to wield a false-sense of “power” over their “victim”. I don’t simply wait until Domestic Violence Awareness Month to educate the masses. I’m focused on year-round help, healing, and empowerment. Since we’re starting a new year I decided to “dig in the crates” and find an oldie but goody message that I shared from the past on my Paradigm Life blog, and reposted here.

When we look at abusers, one type of person that often goes overlooked but always leaves you perplexed and bewildered is the narcissist. This is because the vast majority of us don’t know that someone’s a narcissist and many narcissists don’t even self-identify (why in the world would they accept responsibility and take ownership for something that doesn’t make them sparkle bright?). They’re simply labeled as “arrogant”, “pompous”, or “spoiled”. But it can go deeper and darker depending on how long this personality has been free to roam and stir up a path of destruction. Left unchecked and untreated they can disrupt families, workplaces, communities and more—and in their minds, everyone is to blame but them.

When we look at the #MeToo movement you can’t help but to see a common thread amongst the individuals being accused of harassment and abuse–decades of narcissism (of various degrees) on the loose. For the most part these are career-related, workplace scenarios being described. Or examples of powerful individuals using the power that they have achieved from their careers to take something from someone less powerful. Imagine the context with personal interactions within the home, with spouses, family and friends. This personality type can be toxic to any environment left unprotected.

Of course there are levels and degrees of narcissism (from basic to sociopath to full on psychopath) and there are many layers of tactics that they deploy (to include gas-lighting, revisionism, and the silent treatment). I’ve personally been on the receiving end of them all, hence one of the reasons that I share with others who may be experiencing some of the same trauma.

Read my October 24, 2014 post from my Paradigm Life blog as we discussed the art and madness of the dreaded Silent Treatment.

Now let’s also be clear, that not every adult who opts for the silent treatment route is a narcissist. They’re just immature and childish, and haven’t let go of the preschool antics. However, if you see and experience a pattern of behavior that frequently includes this tactic—you’re most likely tussling with a narcissist. Beware!

~Natasha

Copyright 2014-2018. Natasha L. Foreman/Natasha Foreman Bryant. All Rights Reserved.

I’ve been researching narcissism lately and even shared some amazing facts about the narcissists weapon of choice on my Paradigm Life blog, since the act of giving someone the silent treatment is emotional abuse—and I was taking part in bringing awareness to abuse and domestic violence (for Domestic Violence Awareness month).

According to PsychCentral, “In order for a person to be diagnosed with narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) they must meet five or more of the following symptoms”:

• Has a grandiose sense of self-importance (e.g., exaggerates achievements and talents, expects to be recognized as superior without commensurate achievements)

• Is preoccupied with fantasies of unlimited success, power, brilliance, beauty, or ideal love

• Believes that he or she is “special” and unique and can only be understood by, or should associate with, other special or high-status people (or institutions)

• Requires excessive admiration

• Has a very strong sense of entitlement, e.g., unreasonable expectations of especially favorable treatment or automatic compliance with his or her expectations

• Is exploitative of others, e.g., takes advantage of others to achieve his or her own ends

• Lacks empathy, e.g., is unwilling to recognize or identify with the feelings and needs of others

• Is often envious of others or believes that others are envious of him or her

• Regularly shows arrogant, haughty behaviors or attitudes

Sound familiar???

“Narcissistic personality disorder is more prevalent in males than females, and is thought to occur in up to 6.2 percent of the general population.”

How is Narcissistic Personality Disorder Diagnosed?

Personality disorders such as narcissistic personality disorder are typically diagnosed by a trained mental health professional, such as a psychologist or psychiatrist. Family physicians and general practitioners are generally not trained or well-equipped to make this type of psychological diagnosis. So while you can initially consult a family physician about this problem, they should refer you to a mental health professional for diagnosis and treatment. There are no laboratory, blood or genetic tests that are used to diagnose personality disorder.

Many people with narcissistic personality disorder don’t seek out treatment. People with personality disorders, in general, do not often seek out treatment until the disorder starts to significantly interfere or otherwise impact a person’s life. This most often happens when a person’s coping resources are stretched too thin to deal with stress or other life events.

Treatment of Narcissistic Personality Disorder
Treatment of narcissistic personality disorder typically involves long-term psychotherapy with a therapist that has experience in treating this kind of personality disorder. Medications may also be prescribed to help with specific troubling and debilitating symptoms. For more information about treatment, please see narcissistic personality disorder treatment.</em

Source:
http://psychcentral.com/disorders/narcissistic-personality-disorder-symptoms/